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Posts Tagged ‘colaspis’

Over the weekend Sebe Brown scouted a field in Concordia parish where the stand was being severely reduced by colaspis larvae feeding on seedlings. Problems with this field started on March 16 when the stand began to decline. The plants were described as yellow and stunted. This was a Dermacor X-100 treated hybrid rice field no-till drill-planted at a 23 lbs/acre seeding rate. Surrounding fields were growing nicely. When Sebe scouted the field on Saturday he confirmed that the injury was being caused by Colaspis larvae feeding on the roots of seedlings. The stand was reduced about 40% by this injury. The recommendation was made to establish a shallow permanent flood to avoid further injury. In a situation like this, where the rice isn’t quite ready for a flood, you may lose some injured plants to the flood. The alternative is to wait to establish flood, during which time the colaspis will continue to injure the seedlings and further reduce the stand. Establishment of a flood on the field will prevent further feeding injury by the colaspis larvae and eventually the larvae will die. Note: according to experts in Arkansas it may take up to a month for colaspis larvae to die in the permanent flood. Click here to read more about colaspis. You can watch a video on how to scout for colaspis here. The Dermacor X-100 should provide about 30% suppression of the colaspis infestation. Next season, they will consider using a CruiserMaxx or NipsitInside seed treatment to target control of colaspis. The use of pyrethroids will not provide control of colaspis because they are injuring the crop below the soil line.


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I had more calls this week about sugarcane beetles, chinch bugs, colaspis and bill bugs in rice in Southwestern Louisiana. In the majority of these fields, no insecticide seed treatment had been applied to the seed. The best response is to bring a flood as soon as possible. If this isn’t possible, some crop advisors have reported substantial improvement in the stand following  a pyrethroid spray and holding a light flush for a couple of days.

If you’d like to see a video of a sugarcane beetle digging back into the soil after I removed it from the soil you can click here. Thanks to Extension Entomologist Kathy Flanders at Auburn University for posting the video on my behalf. I shot this video at a field we scouted with Barrett Courville and Benet Augustine last week.

After doing more research on the bill bugs we collected, we found that we have not one, but four species of bill bugs that were collected from a single field. We are doing more work to tease out the species complex that occurs in south Louisiana. If you find any bill bugs in rice please get them to your local county agent and ask them to deliver to me. You can simply throw then in a ziploc bag and kill in the freezer. Please write the farmer name (or some other way to note the field location) and date on the bag. If you can record gps coordinates and e-mail to me that would be a real help. 

Update on the LSU AgCenter rice water weevil demonstration test:

We planted our final field location in Avoyelles Parish on April 27, 2011. We have a stand of rice and will take data on the stand on May 23, 2011. The majority of our other demonstration locations are at or near permanent flood. We will be running around pulling core samples from all the locations in the middle of June. To learn more about rice water weevil biology and our sampling methods you can watch this video

Field meeting season will kick off soon.

Please mark the following dates on your calendar:

June 1, 2011: Rice field tour in Welsh, LA. I will post an agenda soon. I’ll be in hand to discuss rice insect management and field observations.

June 15, 2011: LSU AgCenter South Farm Tour in Crowley, LA. We will have a meeting at our rice water weevil demo test site on the Simon Farm, which will include a sponsored lunch (Special thanks to our sponsors: John Bordlee – Valent; Toby McCown – Dupont, and Josh Zaunbrecher – Syngenta). 

June 30, 2011: LSU AgCenter Rice Research Station Field Day in Crowley, LA.

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This morning I admired the moon setting over University Lakes on my way into campus. Wait a minute, I was biking into campus by moonlight? Yep, a sure sign of field season – early mornings and long (but exciting) days. Today we headed down to Jefferson-Davis Parish to scout a couple of fields that were suffering from stand loss due to an unknown cause. In one location we are still trying to determine the cause. In the second field we scouted we confirmed a fairly severe colaspis infestation. We met with Farmer Kyle Fontenot, Consultant Ron Smith and Nicky Miller at the field which is located between Hathaway and Elton.
 

Kyle Fontenot, Anna, Nicky Miller, and Ron Smith. Note that Kyle and Nicky were both on their iPhones connecting with me on the blog and facebook.

 
Within a few minutes of digging we had no trouble finding many plants with colaspis larvae feeding on the roots, causing the plants to decline and eventually die.

Stand reduction in a hybrid rice field that was caused by colaspis larvae feeding on the roots of the plants.

 

We typically found the larvae on dying plants approximately 2 inches below the soil line.
A colaspis larva.
A colaspis pupa near the tip of a knife blade to give you an idea of the size.
 

 

It is worth noting the history of this particular field. In 2010 it was used as cattle pasture. To prepare the field for rice, the farmer plowed in the fall, burned the vegetation (with fire) in December/January, then plowed again, and finally plowed, shanked, and fertilized before planting. Rice was broadcast and then packed. The planting method made it even harder to determine the cause of injury because we did not observe the typical loss of plants along a drill row that we have seen in the past with colaspis infestations.

Visit this website for more information on the biology and scouting for colaspis in rice: http://www.lsuagcenter.com/en/crops_livestock/crops/rice/Insects/LSU+AgCenter+Rice+Training+Session+How+to+Scout+for+Grape+Colaspis+in+Rice.htm

This field was planted with hybrid rice seed that was treated with Apron, Maxim, Dynasty and Dermacor X-100. Dermacor has a registration for suppression of colaspis and previous research has indicated it will provide about 40% control. It is possible the injury would have been worse without the Dermacor X-100 treatment. If CruiserMaxx or NipsitInside would have been used, then we probably would not have experienced this much stand reduction. Dermacor was selected because of the history of rice water weevil pressure at the field site. It was determined that a replant was not necessary. At this point, the only option is to bring a light pin-point flood to hopefully stop the feeding of the colaspis larvae and prevent further injury of the rice.

I suspect that the colaspis problems may be more widespread. After they left this field Ron Smith called to say that they also found colaspis in another nearby field. I’ll be back down that way next week to further investigate the situation.

 

 

 
 

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If you reach way back in your memory, some of you may remember completing the 2009 Louisiana rice insects survey at one of the winter production meetings back in January or February of this year.  The surveys were distributed in Louisiana, Texas, Missouri, Mississippi and Arkansas this year.  Anna and I have recently completed a summary of the responses and I’ll use this series of posts to provide an overview of a few observations.  Keep in mind that the trends reported in this posting relate to the 2009 production season, not the 2010 production season.  We will distribute a survey about the 2010 production season at the winter meetings in January.

Participants from the circled Louisiana parishes completed our survey.

184 survey sheets were processed from the following states: Louisiana (146), Texas (47), Missouri (5), Mississippi (2), and Arkansas (1).  In Louisiana, respondents from the following parishes completed surveys: Acadia, Avoyelles, Beauregard, Calcasieu, Caldwell, Cameron, Catahoula, Concordia, East Carroll, Evangeline, Franklin, Jefferson Davis, Lafayette, Madison, Morehouse, Ouachita, Point Coupee, Rapides, Richland, St. Landry, and Vermilion (see map above).  

We would like to thank all rice industry members who participated in this survey and helped to distribute the survey sheets. This survey was supported in part by the Louisiana Rice Research Board and the Southern Region Integrated Pest Management Program.

My comments will mostly be confined to the Louisiana responses at this time.  The demographics of the participants in Louisiana was broken down as follows: rice farmers (79%), consultants (12%), dealers (7%), and others (10%, e.g. county agents, researchers, manufacturer representatives, marketing managers and land owners).  The length of time that repondents have been involved with rice production varied from less than five to more than forty years, with the greatest percentage (18%) with 26 to 30 years of experience.  Approximately 76% of the survey respondents farmed or consulted on less than 2500 acres of rice in the 2009 production season.

The first series of questions related to insect infestations which were severe enough to warrant an insecticide treatment.  92% of Louisiana respondents reported that they had some fields that required treatment for rice water weevils.  88% of the respondents reported problems with rice stink bugs.  While fewer people reported infestations of grasshoppers (24%), armyworms (24%), and chinch bugs (23%).  The next most commonly reported insects were the rice leafminer (12%), stalkborers (11%) and colaspis (11%).  Less than 10% of repsondents reported infestations of rice seed midge, aphids, rice levee bill bug, or south American rice miner that warranted an insecticide treatment. 

We asked more detailed questions about rice water weevil management strategies.  A large portion of our time is dedicated to rice water weevil management because this insect traditionally causes the most significant damage to Louisiana rice production from season to season.

In both the 2008 and the 2009 production season survey, we asked the following question:

If rice water weevils were a problem in your rice field(s), which method did you use to control or prevent a rice water weevil infestation? Note that respondents could choose more than one answer since they are completing a survey that relates to more than one production field.  That will explain why the total response does not equal 100%.

In 2008, among 163 respondents in Louisiana, the most common method used to control or prevent rice water weevil was drained field (43%).

In 2009 among 130 respondents in Louisiana, the most common method used to control or prevent rice water weevil was Dermacor X-100 seed treatment (52%).  In 2009, this was the only seed treatment available for use in rice.

Method used to control rice water weevil in Louisiana rice fields

2008 Percentage (%) 2009 Percentage (%)
Drained field 43 34
Post-flood treatment with a foliar spray of pyrethroid 39 44
Pre-flood treatment with a foliar spray of pyrethroid 36 37
Pre-flood treatment with a pyrethroid impregnated on fertilizer 21 22
Post-flood treatment with Trebon 20 10
Early planting to avoid infestation 18 31
Dermacor X-100 Seed Treatment 17 52
Pre-flood and Post-flood treatment with a pyrethroid 13 N/A
Delayed application of permanent flood 13 27
Pre-flood treatment with Trebon 9 7
Nothing 6 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was a decrease in the percentage of respondents who reported that they drained a field for weevil management while their was a substantial increase in the adoption of seed treatments and cultural practices (early planting and delayed application of permanent flood) which should result in decreased weevil injury.

The next installation in this series of blog posts will focus on questions related to rice stink bug management.  Do these observations reflect what you experienced in the 2009 or 2010 production seasons?

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This is a reminder about the rice field clinic to be held tomorrow morning. Reeton School road is located about 2 miles south of the caution light on Hwy 13 at the Mamou / Oberlin rd. intersection. At Reeton School rd. turn east, go to the 1st curve, (1 mile), and continue straight on the field rd. You should be able to see vehicles straight ahead of you on the field rd.

At the second stop, at Kody & Larry Biebers, we will have refreshments and snacks.

News Release

By Keith A. Fontenot

County Agent, Evangeline Parish

            The Evangeline Parish LSU AgCenter Cooperative Extension Service will hold its Annual Rice Field Clinic Tuesday, May 25, 2010 beginning at 8:00 a.m.  This year’s clinic will feature variety trials, fertilization, weed, insects and diseases of rice.

            Please join us on this day for a morning rice field tour.  We will meet at the agronomy plots first, at B & R Farms which are located one mile East of Highway 13 off of Reeton School Road.   After that part of the program we will travel about 3 miles North on Highway 13 to Bieber Road, then one mile west to the Kody & Larry Bieber farm bins for the rest of the tour program.

8:00—8:15 am  Arrival at  B & R farm field on Reeton School Road, Dr. Harrells Agronomy plots, site of Colaspis find

8:15—8:35        Dr. Harrell- Plot Research on Avail, Organolize, P, K, & Zn plots

8:35—9:00         Dr. Hummel—Dermacor, Cruiser Plot work, Colaspis & Weevil Control

9:00—9:15        Travel to Bieber Farms, site of variety test plots on Bieber Rd., 1 mile West of Mamou

9:15—9:35        Variety Development at the variety plots along the road, Drs. Linscombe & Sha

Under the oak tree:

9:40—10:00      Dr Saichuk—Growing Season Update, Field Situations

10:00—10:20    Dr Webster—Herbicide Application Updates; Other ??

10:20- 10:40     Dr. Groth—Fungicides; New Products,  Application Rates, Timing

10:40-11:00      Dr. Salassi—Market Update

Plenty of refreshments and snacks will be served, courtesy of RiceTec seed.  Even though you may not be able to stay for the entire meeting, we would like to have you visit with us as long as you can.

The LSU AgCenter prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disabilities, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status.   Persons with disabilities, who require alternative means for communication of program information or other assistance, should contact the Evangeline Parish office of the LSU AgCenter at (337) 363-5646.

Keith A. Fontenot

County Agent/Parish Chairman

Evangeline Parish

Office – (337) 363-5646

Cell – (337) 290-0510

Fax (337) 363-1210

E-Mail (kfontenot@agctr.lsu.edu)

Website (http://www.lsuagcenter.com)

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Today I met Dr. Dustin Harrel (Rice Agronomist, housed at the rice research station at Crowley) at his agronomy test plot location in Evangeline Parish.  Dustin had called me last Friday because he was seeing stand reduction in his test plots and found that colaspis larvae were causing the damage.  I recommended that he put a flush across the field immediately.  The field was flushed and then we had to wait for it to firm up to take some data on the damage caused by the colaspis. 

Today, we evaluated the plots and decided the best way to start to assess damage would be to measure the length of the gaps where plants were killed by colaspis larvae feeding on the roots.  Dustin’s assistants – Jacob and Ron – graciously assisted with the measuring of the gaps. 

Each plot is 7 rows wide. Jacob measured the length of all the gaps caused by colaspis. At the end of the season we will take yield.

 

It was not hard to find the damage in the field, but it did turn out to be hard to find the culprit.  

Misses in drill rows were caused by colaspis larvae feeding at the base of the plant.

 

After much persistence in searching (while we measured gaps) Dustin found a colaspis larva in one of the plots on the edge of the test area. 

Colaspis larva that was found feeding on the base of a rice plant.

 

Dustin has agreed to let us monitor the colaspis damage in 12 of his test plots.  These plants were grown from seed treated with Dermacor X-100.  Unfortunately, we do not have any plots in this test treated with CruiserMaxx or untreated for comparison.  As usually happens in science, colaspis have not caused any damage in any of my “planned” test plots.  I am hoping we will learn more about the biology of this pest in these test plots.  One thing we have already learned from this location is that a flush really did help the situation.  When he first saw the damage in the plots, Dustin said the plants were producing red leaves, almost like they had suffered herbicide injury.  Now, those damaged plants are hard to find because they have dried up and died.  The rest of the plants seem to be doing very well.  

We will continue to monitor these plots for the duration of the season.  This site will also be a tour stop on the Evangeline Parish Rice Tour, May 25, 2010.  Please check the blog for an announcement about the tour.  If you’d like a refresher on how to scout for colaspis please view the scouting video posted at the LSU AgCenter website, or the powerpoint presentations posted from the training we conducted in May 2009.

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Today we met with cooperators in St. Landry to look at the differences in stand emergence between the insecticide treated (Dermacor X-100, CruiserMaxx) and non-insecticide treated seed (fungicide only).  This location is a joint effort between LSU AgCenter, Horizon Ag, DuPont and Syngenta.  We are evaluating CL151 planted at a variety of seeding rates (#40, #55, #65, #70, #85, #100).     

Dermacor X-100 treated seed to left of flag, untreated seed (fungicide only) to right of flag.

 

 There was no noticeable difference between the Dermacor X-100 and CruiserMaxx treated seed.  These were both planted at 65 lbs per acre.     

Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the left of flag, CruiserMaxx treated seed to the right. No visible difference in stand at this time.

 

 CruiserMaxx is applied at 3.3 fl oz/100 lbs seed, regardless of seeding rate.  One of the objectives of this test is to confirm that CruiserMaxx provides the same level of rww control at low and high seeding rates.  The seeding rates that we are evaluating include the following: 40, #55, #65, #70, #85, #100.  At this point, there is no real visible difference in stand, except when comparing the high (#100) to low (#40).    

CruiserMaxx treated CL151 - plants are just beginning to emerge from the ground. Planted at 40 lbs/acre.

 

CruiserMaxx treated CL151 seed planted at 100 lbs/acre.

 

 We dug around in the untreated area for a little while to see if we could find colaspis larvae feeding on the roots.  We did not find any today.  We’ll return to take stand counts in about two weeks.  These first few weeks of the test are critical for detecting colapsis damage, if it occurs.    

Scouting for colaspis in untreated check area.

 

In the above picture, Dermacor X-100 treated seed is to the LEFT of the white flag.  Untreated area is to the right of the flag.

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