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Posts Tagged ‘CruiserMAXX’

The new seed treatments are a tool we have available in rice integrated pest managent.  The goal of these treatments is to prevent infestation by rice water weevil larvae.  The two treatments that are available provide variable levels of weevil control.  Historically, Dermacor X-100 has provided a better level of rice water weevil control than CruiserMaxx.  Dermacor typically provides about 95 to 98% control of rww larvae.  CruiserMaxx provides above 80% control.  With this difference in the level of control, it would not be surprising to see some larvae in bucket samples in infested fields.  This year we are evaluating Dermacor X-100 and CruiserMaxx in side-by-side commercial field evaluations.  The data are now coming in.

With a seed treatment it is best not to trust blindly that control will occur because you booked the seed treatment.  I have received a few reports of fields where there was a mix-up with the seed treatment.  The end result was that the seed treatment was not applied on the seed and a weevil infestation was not prevented.  In some cases, this was caught early enough to do something.  In other cases, the rice was past green ring and so there were no options for weevil management.

I’d like to remind everyone to take the time to scout and monitor even those fields that were treated with Dermacor X-100 or CruiserMaxx.  If you happen to find weevil larvae in your field, and you catch the infestation early enough you might need to drain the field.  There are a lot of variables that play into draining – maturity of the crop, time required to drain and reflood the field, availability of water to reflood, and weather conditions.  The LSU AgCenter is not confident in the ability of draining to manage an existing rww infestation, but sometimes this is a measure of last resort.  The research on draining has had mixed results.  We have one drained test plot this year, and Mike and I are discussing some possible research on draining in the future.

If you have fields where the seed treatment is not providing adequate control, please contact me or your local county agent to report the problem.  We are just beginning to take core samples from our test plots.  i will have some results from the core sampling available by next week.

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After wrapping up at the Hoffpauir farm, Barrett and I headed over to Jeff-Davis Parish to take stand counts at the demonstration that Mark Pousson has planted.  The rice is coming along nicely.  At this location, the seed treatments are planted side-by-side in the same cut.  This allows us to easily observe any differences in plant height, vigor, or stand thickness between treatments.  As we were taking stand counts, Barrett observed that if you stood on the edge of the field you could easily see a difference between the untreated seed and the CruiserMaxx treated seed.  I took a few pictures.

Rows of rice grown from untreated seed (no insecticide treatment) in comparison to CruiserMaxx treated seed. The rows are much more visible in the CruiserMaxx treated area.

In the picture above, the untreated area is to the left of the center, while the CruiserMaxx treated plants are to the right.  We don’t know if this will translate to a difference in yield, but it is interesting to note the difference in plant vigor in the early season.

While walking through the field, we also noticed some interesting clusters of eggs.

Egg mass in the water.

Barrett held the egg mass in his hand for a closer look.

I’m not sure if these are frog eggs, but that’s what they look like.  This is a nice reminder of the important job that rice fields serve as a home for a variety of wildlife.  It’s a great working environment for a weekend naturalist.

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Yesterday Barrett Courville and I took stand counts at the Hoffpauir Demo location that is just southwest of Rayne, La (Acadia Parish).  Boy, it was another beautiful day here in south Louisiana!  The fields are coming along well.  We took stand counts and plant height measurements in Dermacor X-100, Cruiser-Maxx and one untreated cut.  We will be entering and analyzing the data soon.  In the meantime, here are some pictures of the fields. 

Plants grown from Dermacor X-100 treated seed.

Plants grown from CruiserMaxx treated seed.

Plants grown from seed that had fungicide, but no insecticide seed treatments. The flush was starting to move across this field.

The next step with this field will be to scout for rww adults in the days leading up to permanent flood.  If rww adults and scarring are found in the field, we will apply a pyrethroid to two of the cuts at the eastern end of the series of cuts.

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Last Friday we took stand counts at the Morein Farm in Evangeline Parish.  This site is located on Miller Lake Road in Ville Platte.  It was selected because neighboring fields suffered a stand reduction due to colaspis larvae feeding on the seedling rice in the 2009 field season.  These particular fields were planted into fields where soybeans were grown last season.  There was no apparent visual difference between the treatments at this time.  The untreated area has a little thinner stand.  

Stand of rice grown from CruiserMaxx treated seed.

Plants grown from Dermacor X-100 treated seed.

Plants grown from seed that did not have an insecticide seed treatment. To the left of the white flags, are CruiserMaxx treated plants.

We did not observe any damage from colaspis.   The stand counts were taken 2 weeks after emergence.  The rice is growing strong.  To measure the stand emergence, we started in one corner of the field and then walked 11 paces between five different spaces in the field.  We measured 6 feet of drill row, counted the number of plants and took the height of 10 plants. The stand count data will be analyzed soon.

Dennis Fontenot and Anna Meszaros recording stand counts and plant height in the CruiserMaxx treated field.

Dennis will continue to closely monitor this field and let us know if any damage from colaspis begins to show up.  Last year, the first reports occurred in mid-May.

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Today we met with cooperators in St. Landry to look at the differences in stand emergence between the insecticide treated (Dermacor X-100, CruiserMaxx) and non-insecticide treated seed (fungicide only).  This location is a joint effort between LSU AgCenter, Horizon Ag, DuPont and Syngenta.  We are evaluating CL151 planted at a variety of seeding rates (#40, #55, #65, #70, #85, #100).     

Dermacor X-100 treated seed to left of flag, untreated seed (fungicide only) to right of flag.

 

 There was no noticeable difference between the Dermacor X-100 and CruiserMaxx treated seed.  These were both planted at 65 lbs per acre.     

Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the left of flag, CruiserMaxx treated seed to the right. No visible difference in stand at this time.

 

 CruiserMaxx is applied at 3.3 fl oz/100 lbs seed, regardless of seeding rate.  One of the objectives of this test is to confirm that CruiserMaxx provides the same level of rww control at low and high seeding rates.  The seeding rates that we are evaluating include the following: 40, #55, #65, #70, #85, #100.  At this point, there is no real visible difference in stand, except when comparing the high (#100) to low (#40).    

CruiserMaxx treated CL151 - plants are just beginning to emerge from the ground. Planted at 40 lbs/acre.

 

CruiserMaxx treated CL151 seed planted at 100 lbs/acre.

 

 We dug around in the untreated area for a little while to see if we could find colaspis larvae feeding on the roots.  We did not find any today.  We’ll return to take stand counts in about two weeks.  These first few weeks of the test are critical for detecting colapsis damage, if it occurs.    

Scouting for colaspis in untreated check area.

 

In the above picture, Dermacor X-100 treated seed is to the LEFT of the white flag.  Untreated area is to the right of the flag.

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Yesterday we planted two demonstration sites.  We started bright and early at Charlie Fontenot’s farm in St. Landry Parish.  Michael Fruge and Sunny Bottoms (both with Horizon Ag) brought their 20 foot Great Plains drill out to the site.  Vince Deshotel met me a the farm office and told me that he had received a call from Kent Guillory telling us that Dave Morein decided to plant his colaspis test site that afternoon.  So, it turned out to be a full day of rice planting. The weather could not have been better and the blue skies with white fluffy clouds were breathtaking.

Planting started with two passes of CL151 seed that was not treated with an insecticide.  This untreated area borders the field road and is next to a marshy area with trees.  There is a good chance that if weevils are overwintering, they will be found near this edge of the field.

After two passes of untreated seed, we cleaned out the drill, and loaded sacks of Dermacor X-100 treated CL151.  6 passes of Dermacor treated seed was planted at the 65 lb seeding rate.  The drill was cleaned out again and loaded up with CL151 treated with CruiserMaxx.  At this point, we started planting a seeding rate trial.  CL151 was planted at a variety of seeding rates.  This will give us a chance to evaluate CL151 at different seeding rates, and also the efficacy of CruiserMaxx at a variety of seeding rates.

This site was chosen because Charlie is suspicious that he experienced stand loss from Colaspis larvae damaging seedlings last season.  If the colaspis show up this season, we will be able to compare Dermacor X-100 and CruiserMaxx activity against this pest.  Also, in the past Charlie has treated with pyrethroids for weevil management.  We are curious to see what the rww population is typically like at this site.  Of course, this year may not be a typical year.  That remains to be seen.

I asked Charlie to call me when first emergence of seedlings is observed.  We’ll take observations on date of first emergence, and then stand counts and plant height 14 days after emergence.  If colaspis are a problem in this field, the damage will be observed in those first few weeks after emergence.

We left Charlie’s at about 11 am to head over to Evangeline Parish.  On the way Dave called, because there had been a break-down and planting would be delayed until about 2 or 3 pm.  No problem, we just took our time heading east.  When the time was right, we headed over to meet Dave Morein, Brian (Dave’s son who is now farming with him full-time), and Dennis Fontenot (Consultant).  When we pulled up dark clouds were threatening and rain started sprinkling lightly as we were planting the last field.

This series of fields is bordered on three sides by Miller Lake and a thick stand of trees.  Historically, there are high populations of rice water weevils.  Dennis had scouted this field site for us last season to monitor the adult colaspis in a field of beans next to a cut of rice that had substantial stand loss from colaspis damage.  In this test we will again compare an untreated check to CruiserMaxx and Dermacor X-100 seed treatment.

When we arrived, Dave had some Dermacor X-100 treated seed still loaded in the drill. left-over from planting another field.  We vacuumed out the hopper and loaded untreated seed.  This series of fields is planted in CLXL729 at a 25 lb seeding rate.  In our test, we are comparing an untreated field, and two passes on the south side of a neighboring cut (both are the high points in this area) to Dermacor X-100, and CruiserMaxx treated fields.

We will be scouting intensively during the first two weeks after emergence to see if the colaspis larvae overwintered and may cause damage in the rice.  Dennis had GPS marked his sampling sites in the untreated rice field and we will mark those with flags and sample the area for larvae.  It will be interesting to see if there is a relationship between the adult colaspis population in the soybeans last season, and the population of colapsis larvae in the  seedling rice this season.

I’m not sure what transpired with the rain that was just starting to come down when we left the field.  I’ll be checking in with Kenneth LaHaye this afternoon.  Tentative plans are to plant at the LaHaye farm in Evangeline Parish tomorrow.  Of course, it all depends on the weather.  We also may plant in Acadia, Concordia, and Evangeline Parish this week.

Sorry I did not include pictures, I need to load my download cable in my camera bag.  I’ll try to add pictures in the next few days.

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Today we planted a Horizon Ag Strip Trial at the Lawson Farm in Crowley, La.  At first, we weren’t sure if the soil was dry enough, and there was also a light crust on the soil.

Rain the previous week had left a crust on the soil.

The soil did not want to close over the drill passes - went to plan b.

We were not happy with this drill row appearance - seed is not adequately covered.

After breaking the crust with a harrow, we were able to drill the seed.

Lightly and quickly running a harrow before the drill broke up the crust enough to allow closure of the drill rows.

This test will compare CruiserMaxx and Dermacor X-100 to an untreated check.

Treated seed receives a dye - on the left is CruiserMaxx treated seed and on the right is untreated seed.

We will be looking for colaspis activity in addition to rww efficacy.  A number of clearfield varieties were planted.

In a nearby field, we will compare a variety of seeding rates with CruiserMaxx treatment.  This will help us answer some of the questions about CruiserMaxx activity at lower seeding rates. RWW core samples will be taken 4 weeks after permanent flood to assess insecticide activity.

There is nothing like the appearance of straight, newly planted drill rows. I was impressed by the driving – no GPS used here!

We will be closely watching these two fields for first emergence of seedlings.  Previous research in Arkansas has found that Cruiser treated seed emerges more quickly than untreated seed.  Also, the first two weeks after emergence are a critical time to monitor for damage from colapsis larvae.

I anticipate that we will be planting all over the place next week – if it doesn’t rain Saturday.  The instructions are to pray for NO RAIN.  Tomorrow morning we plan to plant in St. Landry Parish.

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