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Posts Tagged ‘evangeline’

It’s that time of the year again, all the rice folks hunker down for Christmas break and then hit the roads running to winter rice meetings across the state.  The first week of January will be busy, followed by a smattering of meetings throughout the month.  This post provides information for the meeting plans that have been finalized to date.  Please contact your local county agent for information on meetings in your region. 

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!  I look forward to seeing you in 2011.

DISCLAIMER: please contact your local County Agent to verify the time, location, and program for this meeting.

Southwest Louisiana Rice and Soybean Forum, January 4, 2011, Welsh Community Center. Agenda follows:

8:00 a.m.                                     Welcome……………………………………………………………… Allen Hogan & Barrett Courville

8:05 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.              Rice Production Practices for 2011………………… Dr. Johnny Saichuk, LSU AgCenter Rice Specialist

8:30 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.              Rice Variety Update…………………………………… Dr. Steve Linscombe, LSU AgCenter Rice Breeder

8:55 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.              Rice Weed Management…………………………………. Dr. Eric Webster, LSU AgCenter Weed Scientist

9:25 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.              Rice Disease Management………………………………….. Dr. Don Groth, LSU AgCenter Plant Pathologist

9:50 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.            Rice Fertility…………………………………………………. Dr. Dustin Harrell, LSU AgCenter Agronomist

10:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.          Break

10:30 a.m. – 10:55 a.m.          Rice Insect Management……………………………. Dr. Natalie Hummel, LSU AgCenter Entomologist

10:55 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.          Rice and Soybean Market Update………………………. Dr. Kurt Guidry, LSU AgCenter Economist

11:20 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.          Soybean Varieties & Management Practice………… Dr. Ronald Levy, LSU AgCenter Soybean Specialist

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.         Lunch

12:30 p.m. – 12:55 p.m.         Soybean and Wheat Disease Management……….. Dr. Boyd Padgett, LSU AgCenter Plant Pathologist

12:55 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.           Soybean Weed Control……………………………………….. Dr. Jim Griffin, LSU AgCenter

1:20 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.             Soybean Demonstrations……………………………………….. Allen Hogan

2011 Evangeline/St. Landry Rice & Soybean School, Wednesday, January 5, 2011.  Please contact County Agent Keith Fontenot for an agenda and directions.

Acadia Parish, Rice & Soybean Producers Meeting, Thursday, January 6, 2011.  Acadia Parish LSU AgCenter office. Please contact County Agent Barrett Courville for more information.  Agenda follows:

7:30-8:00 a.m. Registration & Coffee

8:00-8:10 a.m. Introductions……………………………………………………………………….Barrett Courville, County Agent, LSU AgCenter

8:10-8:30 a.m. Rice Growers Annual Business Meeting……………………………………….Jerry Leonards, President

8:30-8:50 a.m. Rice Production Practices for 2011……………………………………………..Dr. Johnny Saichuk, Rice Specialist, LSU AgCenter

8:50-9:15 a.m. Rice Variety & Breeding Update…………………………………………………Dr. Steve Linscombe, Rice Breeder, Rice Experiment Station, LSU AgCenter

9:15 – 9:35 a.m. Rice Weed Management………………………………………………………….Dr. Eric Webster, LSU AgCenter

9:35-9:55 a.m. Rice Disease Control Update……………………………………………………….Dr. Don Groth, Pathologist, Rice Experiment Station, LSU AgCenter

9:55-10:15 a.m. Rice Fertility & Agronomics……………………………………………………..Dr. Dustin Harrell, LSU AgCenter

10:15-10:35 a.m. Rice Insect Control………………………………………………………………..Dr. Natalie Hummel, Entomologist, LSU AgCenter

10:35-10:45 a.m. Break – Coffee & Donuts

10:45-11:00 a.m. Rice & Soybean Market Update………………………………………………..Dr. Kurt Guidry, Economist, LSU AgCenter

11:00-11:20 a.m. Soybean Production Practices………………………………………………….Dr. Ronnie Levy, Soybean Specialist, LSU AgCenter

11:20-11:40 a.m. Soybean & Wheat Disease Update……………………………………………..Dr. Boyd Padgett, Plant Pathologist, LSU AgCenter

11:40-12:00 p.m. Soybean Weed Control Update………………………………………………… Dr. James Griffin, LSU AgCenter

12:00-12:15 p.m. Environmental Regulatory Issues……………………………………………. Randy Jemison, USA Rice

12:15-1:00 p.m. Lunch – Courtesy of Sponsors

1:00-1:30 p.m. WPS Regulations & Training……………………………………………………….Barrett Courville, LSU AgCenter

1:30-1:45 p.m. Pesticide Re-Certification……………………………………………………………Department of Agriculture & Forestry

The 38th Annual Vermilion Rice School is scheduled for Friday, Jan. 7, 2011 at the American Legion Home in Kaplan.  For more information please contact County Agent Stuart Gauthier.

The Northeast Louisiana Rice Forum will be held Wednesday, Jan 26, 2011 at the Rayville Civic Center. For more information, please contact County Agent Keith Collins.

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We have finally concluded all of the core sampling for our demonstration test this production season.  We have gathered all the data and Anna conducted a statistical analysis.  In this analysis each location is treated as a replicate.  

Our demonstration test was conducted in all the Louisiana parishes highlighted in purple.

 

We had a total of 15 sites included in our test this year.  We started this season with 5 locations designed to evaluate rww management tactics.  An additional 5 sites were set up to evaluate colaspis management.  We did not have any colaspis infestations in the test sites.  We gained three more weevil test sites that had been planted out either by seed companies or a cooperator, who requested we take samples.  We wound up with a total of 10 locations that were included in the overall data analysis.  More than 500 core samples were processed to generate this dataset – that’s a lot of backbreaking work to pull all the cores and then to wash all that mud from the  roots!  Thanks to our cheerful, hardworking crew for completing this task without complaint.  

We collected weevil cores from all sites 4 weeks post flood.  Our standard method is to take 10 cores per treatment, in a zig-zag pattern across the field, making sure to pull cores from the edge and middle of the cut.  

   

A few trends broke out in the dataset.  In Acadia and Jeff Davis Parishes, we had a relatively light infestation with weevils, except at one location (Lawson Farm) where we had about 10 larvae per core in the untreated check.  In Vermilion Parish we had low to moderate infestations.  In Concordia Parish we had an average of 10 larvae per core in the untreated check.  In Evangeline Parish we had a relatively severe infestation with untreated counts averaging from 10.8 rww larvae per core at the LaHaye farm to 15 larvae per core at the Morein farm site. Our highest population was in St. Landry Parish where we had an average of 21.9 larvae per core in the untreated check.  While, in Tensas Parish (our most northern location) we had an extremely light infestation with zero larvae per core in the untreated check and the highest count of 0.15 larvae per core in the Dermacor X-100 treated cut.  Interestingly at this location, we had a fairly severe infestation in the 2008 production season.  The  graph that follows summarizes the average number of rww larvae per core when we analyzed the entire dataset.  

Average number of rice water weevil larvae per core (calculated from 10 cores per field or cut). Different letters indicate a significant difference in the treatment effectiveness.

 

Overall, Dermacor X-100 provided the best level of weevil control, followed by pyrethroid (either Karate pre,Karate pre + mustangMax on fertilizer post, or Karate post) and CruiserMaxx.  Dermacor X-100 provided significantly better control than the other two treatments.  There was no signficant difference in the core sample average between the pyrethroid and the CruiserMaxx seed treatment. 

Unfortunately, the results from the Hybrid test plots (25 pound or less seeding rate) did not provide any more clarity about the ability of CruiserMaxx to provide effective weevil control at the low seeding rates.  We plan to repeat the demonstration test again next season, particularly focusing on the low seeding rate question.  Mike Stout has some small plot replicated research that may also clarify the question of effectiveness of CruiserMaxx at low seeding rates as currently labeled.  

This was certainly an interesting weevil season, and we learned a lot about weevil management, and just how difficult it can be to scout for adults and properly time insecticide applications.    

We greatly appreciate the support and cooperation of all who are involved with the demonstration test.  Please contact your local county agent, or me, if you have any questions about our observations this season. 

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UPDATE on Tuesday, April 21, 2010:
So far, the aphids have not developed into a problem at any of our field test sites.  I have spoken with quite a few county agents and consultants about the aphid situation this season.  It seems like we have had more than the usual infestation of aphids.  It looks like a combination of flushing and biological control (predators and parasitoids) have kept the populations under control.  Please contact your local county agent if you see anything that indicates otherwise.  I’ll be out in Acadia Parish tomorrow looking at some of our field sites.  About two weeks ago the rice was just emerging at the Hoffpauir demo site in Rayne, La.  The rice was around first leaf stage, and some aphids were present.  Tomorrow, I’ll look closely for any existing aphids when we take stand counts and plant heights.
 
Hope your crop is progressing well.
 
Natalie
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Well the phone started ringing Monday morning with reports of aphids in rice.  This really isn’t surprising since we have had such cool weather conditions.  I called up Dr. Jeff Davis (LSU AgCenter Soybean Entomologist) to see if he would like some samples for aphid colonies he is establishing.  Jeff headed out to the field yesterday and was able to collect samples and (conveniently) identify them to species.  It’s really handy to have an aphid expert in the department.  Jeff collected aphids in Acadia and Evangeline Parishes.

Below is an excerpt from an e-mail he sent after he completed the identifications:   

“We saw a lot of parasitism at both locations.  In Ville Platte, there were aphids on the grasses in the field as well as parasitoids.  This may indicate that the aphids were on the grasses and when growers applied their herbicide, the aphids moved to the emerging rice.  Recommendation:  Good weed control early and prior to emergence so aphids do not move to young rice.  No aphids [observed] on the Cruiser treated seed.  I do not know how long this will last.  In soybean, we typically get 30 day control.   

Aphid Identification:          

  • Crowley:  All bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi
  • Ville Platte:  60% English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae; 30% bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi; and 10% greenbug, Schizaphis graminum”

I was able to get out to the field today to scout some fields and view the situation.  The first stop was at the LaHaye rww demonstration site.  Kenneth was starting to flush the field.  There is a good chance that flushing might take care of the aphid problem.  We saw a lot of aphids on the rice, which is at the first leaf stage of growth.   

Flush moving onto the field.

The little specks on the rice seedlings are aphids. You'll need a hand-lens to see the details.

 

I agree with Jeff that this problem is caused by a combination of factors:   

  1. Burndown applied immediately before planting.  These aphids are feeding on weeds in the field, and when the weeds start to die they move onto newly emerged seedlings.  If there was a way to have more time between burndown and planting, that would probably help this situation.  I do realize that we are restricted by the weather. 
  2. Cool weather.  Aphids can establish on seedlings and will likely cause more damage on slow growing rice.

We observed a lot of parasitized aphids on weeds that were dying from the herbicide applications.   

Parasitized aphids on a weed that was dying from exposure to the burn-down herbicide.

 

I can make a few generalized statements about our observations:   

  1. aphids were more abundant in stands of rice that did not have a seed treatment.
  2. it appeared that the CruiserMaxx provided protection from the aphids, although this is a natural infestation and we are not looking at a small plot evaluation test, so this observation is not conclusive. 
  3. predators and parasitoids were abundant, and may be able to provide control, if given enough time (for pictures, continue reading).
  4. plants did not look stressed by the infestation.

        

Recommendations:   

We do not have standard recommendations or thresholds for treatment of aphids in rice.  Proper identification is the first step in deciding the course of action.  Some species of aphids produce toxic saliva that can cause stunting or death of small seedling rice.  In the past it has been noted that when the fields are flushed, weather warms up, and rice begins to grow, there is no need for treatment.  Also, if predators and parasitized aphids are observed in the field, you should continue to monitor the situation and avoid treating unless the plants begin to look stressed.  One field in Evangeline was treated with Karate on Monday.  I scouted the field today and did not see any insects.  Note that any predators were present they were also killed by the pyrethroid spray.  If your pyrethroid spray is not adequate, and the aphid population returns, but with no predators in the field, then you could really be in a bind.  I recommend waiting a few days to pull the trigger, monitor the health of the rice, and look for predators.  If you have questions about treatment, please contact your local county agent.   

Below are some pictures of what we saw in the LaHaye demo fields.    

Adult and immature aphids on leaf blade.

 

Aphids were walking around on the dry soil looking for plants to feed on.

 

Alate aphids have wings, and apterates are wingless.

 

Fortunately, we also found an abundance of predators and parasitoids that are decreasing the aphid population.  This included ladybug larvae and adults, syrphid fly larvae and also parasitic wasps.   

A ladybug larva devouring an aphid.

 

 Ladybugs will eat aphids both in the larval and adult phases.   

The pupal stage of the ladybug beetle - this is the phase between the immature and the adult stages.

 

 The pupal stage is the resting phase between the larva and the adult.   

A ladybug adult. Adults will also eat aphids.

 

A ladybug larvae eating an aphid.

 

Ladybug larvae are definitely voracious predators.  I’m not sure how flushing will affect these predators.  We’ll scout toward the end of next week to see what the predator population looks like after a good flush.   

A parasitoid wasp on a weed in the rice field.

 

Parasitoid wasps control the aphids by producing offspring that devour the aphid from the inside out.  The parasitized aphid turns into a mummy, which is round, shiny and often tan, gold or black in color.  If the wasp has emerged, you will see a round hole in the mummy.

Healthy aphid (green) and parasitized aphid (round and dark color) on a rice seedling stem.

 

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Avery Davidson put together a very nice story about the rww demonstration test which aired on TWILA last week.  You can view the video online at youtube by clicking here.  Thanks to Keith Fontenot and Kenneth LaHaye for participating in this interview.  We appreciate the continuing support of the Louisiana Farm Bureau.

The Hoffpauir demonstration site was planted last week.  County Agent Barrett Courville sent me a few pictures of planting.  At this location we will compare an untreated cut to pyrethroid, Dermacor X-100 and CruiserMaxx insecticide treatments.  The arrangement of cuts at this site allowed us to plant multiple fields with each seed treatment.  So, we will get a little more data than usual at this location.

Darryl Hoffpauir riding on the drill as the untreated check is planted. Photo by Barrett Courville.

This week, we will most likely be planting three more demonstration sites, one each in the following parishes: Concordia, Jeff-Davis, and Vermilion.  I’ll keep you informed as planting progresses.

At the rest of the sites, we are waiting for the first call to report observation of plant emergence.  I think this cold weather is making the plants lazy.  They don’t seem to want to leave the soil.

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Yesterday I visited with cooperators in Evangeline and St. Landry Parishes to discuss this years demonstration sites.

Meeting with (from left to right) Kent Guillory, Keith Fontenot and Kenneth LaHaye at the Evangeline Parish AgCenter office.

County Agents Keith Fontenot and Vince Deshotel and I met with the Morein family, Mr. Kenneth LaHaye and certified crop advisors, Kent Guillory and Dennis Fontenot.  The topic of discussion was plans for the rice water weevil and colaspis demonstration sites.   At Kenneth’s farm we will evaluate the following rww treatments: CruiserMaxx, Dermacor X-100, Pyrethroid and an untreated check.  The pyrethroid treatment will be a shot of Karate with the last application of newpath before permanent flood.  We will come in one week after permanent flood and scout for the presence of adult weevils.  If present, we will make a second application of pyrethroid.

At the Morein farm we will be looking at colaspis management – if they show up in the field.  An adjoining rice field suffered a reduction in plant stand due to colaspis infestation in the 2009 season.  We worked with Mr. Dennis Fontenot to sweep the soybeans in a neighboring field.  Dennis collected data on colaspis density in the beans and also sent us samples for species identification.  This year, rice will be planted into the bean field we  sampled for colaspis adults in 2009.  We have arranged treatments of CruiserMaxx, Dermacor X-100 and some untreated areas in the rice field.  I certainly hope we don’t have problems with colaspis again this season, but if we do, we should be able to learn more about colaspis management.

St. Landry Parish Rice Farmer Charlie Fontenot, Consultant Dean Reed and County Agent Vince Deshotel scouting for colaspis in bean stubble.

After we finalized our plans for the rww and colaspis demos in Evangeline Parish, Vince and I headed over to St. Landry Parish.  I had not realized that St. Landry is such a large Parish.  We stopped at a beautiful spot near a Bayou outside of Palmetto, LA that is farmed by Charlie Fontenot.

Crop Consultant Dean Reed and Charlie are fairly certain that they suffered about a 10% stand loss from colaspis feeding on rice seedlings in 2009.  This resulted in re-planting on high ground in about 200 of the 2,000 acres of rice that Charlie grew last season.  We decided to work with Micheal Fruge (Horizon Ag) on a seeding rate evaluation with some clearfield varieties.  CruiserMaxx will be used as a the seed treatment at multiple seeding rates.  This will give us a chance to evaluate activity at both standard and low seeding rates.  We will also compare to Dermacor X-100 and an untreated check. I don’t know if the colaspis will show up in the rice, and hopefully they don’t turn out to be a problem this season.

Out of curiosity, we dug around in the soybean stubble at a high elevation on the farm to see if we could find any colaspis grubs.  We found an abundance of earthworms and a few other critters in the soil, but no colaspis.  It is possible that they are still down low in the soil profile.  The soil temperature was 69F, and had very nice tilth.  It was nice to give my hands a break from the keyboard for a change.  This should be an interesting test location, and if nothing else it sure is beautiful scenery.

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