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Posts Tagged ‘horizon ag’

It’s funny how when you work a field crop, life eventually moves in a pretty predictable cycle. Well, it’s that time of year again. Time to start scouting for rice stink bugs in headed rice, although it does seem to be coming a little bit earlier than usual. This is probably a result of very early planting of rice in some parts of south Louisiana. Unfortunately, field conditions are favoring a bad year for stink bugs. The drought conditions have killed off grasses that would normally serve as a host/reservoir for stink bugs, so there is a chance they will move more readily into heading rice. Recent reports from Arkansas and Mississippi indicate that large populations of rice stink bugs are present in the mid-south. We are already finding them in headed rice fields at the rice research station in Crowley, La.

Last Friday, Johnny Saichuk and I scouted a variety trial in Vermilion Parish where the CL111 was heading first and was already infested with rice stink bugs.

Rice stinkbugs are light tan in color with points on the corners of the pronotum.

I received a call about the field because they noticed quite a bit of blanking in the panicles. They also found a high population of grasshoppers and suspected they may have been causing injury.

Longhorned grasshopper adult in heading rice. You can tell it is an adult because of the wings.

When we assessed the situation, Johnny determined that the blanking was most likely physiological, some sort of effect of weather conditions when the rice was at panicle development (pd). You can read more about it in his field notes. If you don’t receive Johnny Saichuk’s Field Notes via e-mail, please send Johnny an e-mail to be added to his list: jsaichuk@agcenter.lsu.edu. As we examined the grasshopper situation, we found that the grasshoppers were long-horned grasshoppers, which are typically predators. We would not recommend treating for grasshoppers unless they are causing excessive defoliation. Click here to read more about long-horned grasshoppers in rice. Odds are that they were attracted by the rice stink bugs, which we did find to be abundant in the field. We advised holding off on an insecticide application until the rice reached 50% heading. It is very tempting to put out a pyrethroid with the fungicide application at early-heading, but research has shown that this is too early to prevent injury. Putting out an early application will probably just add to the number of times you need to spray the field, while not providing any additional protection. To learn more about rice stink bug management click here.

We have a graduate student, Bryce Blackman, who is currently studying rice stink bugs for his dissertation research. One aspect of his work is to re-evaluate treatment thresholds. At the moment, we continue to use the standard recommendations. To scout for rice stink bugs in the field, use a 15-inch diameter sweep net, take 10 sweeps at 10 different areas around each field. Count the number of bugs collected after every 10 sweeps. In the first two weeks of heading, treat fields when there are 30 or more bugs per 100 sweeps. Pesticides that can be used include malathion, methyl parathion and a variety of pyrethroids including Declare, Karate Z, Mustang Max, Prolex and a number of generics. From the dough stage until two weeks before harvest, treat fields when there are 100 bugs per 100 sweeps. When approaching two weeks before harvest, you can treat with any of the chemicals listed above with the exception of Karate Z and Prolex, which have 21 day pre-harvest intervals. You can learn more about rice stink bug biology by clicking here.

Resistance to pyrethroids has been increasing in Texas, and there is a chance that we could have some issues with resistance developing in Louisiana also. If you have a field where you are finding it particularly difficult to control the rice stink bugs with your traditional control strategies, please contact me so we can sample the insect population. If you have further questions about rice stink bug management, please contact your local County Agent.

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If you are wondering why I’ve been a little quiet lately, it’s because we’ve been busy cutting test plots and gathering harvest data.  After long days in this horrendous heat, it’s hard to find a desire to sit at a computer and write. This morning it was so dark outside that I tried to fool myself into think it was a nice, cold winter storm – no such luck. 
I’ll wait until all the numbers are in to make any comments about the effect of treatments on yields.  In the meantime, I thought you might like to see some equipment in action.  The best part of harvest is that it really is a gathering of friends.

Dean Reed (Helena), Sunny Bottoms (HorizonAg) and Vince Deshotel (LSU AgCenter) waiting in the shade near the weigh wagon. Charlie was busy trimming the edges so we could cut our passes.

 

The first step is to trim the edges of the field so that we are harvesting from a measurable area and can calculate accurate yields. 

Combine in the background is trimming the edges, and in the direct line of the camera you can see that the front edge has been trimmed to make a clean starting line for the pass.

 

The second step is to run a pass up the treated area. 

The combine is about to finish the first pass in the untreated area.

 

Along the way, the header is cutting the head (panicle) off the rice plant and separating the hull (containing the grain) from the straw.  The grains are collected in the hopper and the straw is ejected out the back of the combine. 

Rice panicle and straw being cut and pulled into the combine - there is a rotating pair of belts that moves the grain and stalk into the combine for sorting.

 

Rice entering the combine hopper - sorry some of these pictures are dusty, but this is dirty work!

 

After the pass is completed, the rice is transferred from the combine into the weigh wagon. 

Combine lined up with the weigh wagon to empty the rice out of the hopper and calculate the yield.

 

The weight, grain moisture, and temperature of grain are recorded.  Then the contents of the weigh wagon are emptied into a grain cart to get ready for the next round. 

The rice is emptied from the weigh wagon into the grain cart.

 

In the meantime, someone else has the physical job (which was tough in that extreme heat yesterday) of measuring the length of the harvested area.  This is measured with a wheel.  Dean Reed was walking the wheel in this picture. 

Dean Reed using a wheel to measure the harvested area. 

This process is repeated until you complete the harvest.  

Birds are often attracted to the combine and are real daredevils as they dive and dodge for grasshoppers, frogs and other critters. 

Rice and soybean farmer Charlie Fontenot anticipates that he will be harvesting for more than 20 days straight to get all the rice cut and then roll into soybean harvest.  We thank him for participating in this variety trial and demonstration test.  The rice we harvested will be fertilized and flooded up for second crop. 

Charlie Fontenot operating his Case combine.

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Today we met with cooperators in St. Landry to look at the differences in stand emergence between the insecticide treated (Dermacor X-100, CruiserMaxx) and non-insecticide treated seed (fungicide only).  This location is a joint effort between LSU AgCenter, Horizon Ag, DuPont and Syngenta.  We are evaluating CL151 planted at a variety of seeding rates (#40, #55, #65, #70, #85, #100).     

Dermacor X-100 treated seed to left of flag, untreated seed (fungicide only) to right of flag.

 

 There was no noticeable difference between the Dermacor X-100 and CruiserMaxx treated seed.  These were both planted at 65 lbs per acre.     

Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the left of flag, CruiserMaxx treated seed to the right. No visible difference in stand at this time.

 

 CruiserMaxx is applied at 3.3 fl oz/100 lbs seed, regardless of seeding rate.  One of the objectives of this test is to confirm that CruiserMaxx provides the same level of rww control at low and high seeding rates.  The seeding rates that we are evaluating include the following: 40, #55, #65, #70, #85, #100.  At this point, there is no real visible difference in stand, except when comparing the high (#100) to low (#40).    

CruiserMaxx treated CL151 - plants are just beginning to emerge from the ground. Planted at 40 lbs/acre.

 

CruiserMaxx treated CL151 seed planted at 100 lbs/acre.

 

 We dug around in the untreated area for a little while to see if we could find colaspis larvae feeding on the roots.  We did not find any today.  We’ll return to take stand counts in about two weeks.  These first few weeks of the test are critical for detecting colapsis damage, if it occurs.    

Scouting for colaspis in untreated check area.

 

In the above picture, Dermacor X-100 treated seed is to the LEFT of the white flag.  Untreated area is to the right of the flag.

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Yesterday we planted two demonstration sites.  We started bright and early at Charlie Fontenot’s farm in St. Landry Parish.  Michael Fruge and Sunny Bottoms (both with Horizon Ag) brought their 20 foot Great Plains drill out to the site.  Vince Deshotel met me a the farm office and told me that he had received a call from Kent Guillory telling us that Dave Morein decided to plant his colaspis test site that afternoon.  So, it turned out to be a full day of rice planting. The weather could not have been better and the blue skies with white fluffy clouds were breathtaking.

Planting started with two passes of CL151 seed that was not treated with an insecticide.  This untreated area borders the field road and is next to a marshy area with trees.  There is a good chance that if weevils are overwintering, they will be found near this edge of the field.

After two passes of untreated seed, we cleaned out the drill, and loaded sacks of Dermacor X-100 treated CL151.  6 passes of Dermacor treated seed was planted at the 65 lb seeding rate.  The drill was cleaned out again and loaded up with CL151 treated with CruiserMaxx.  At this point, we started planting a seeding rate trial.  CL151 was planted at a variety of seeding rates.  This will give us a chance to evaluate CL151 at different seeding rates, and also the efficacy of CruiserMaxx at a variety of seeding rates.

This site was chosen because Charlie is suspicious that he experienced stand loss from Colaspis larvae damaging seedlings last season.  If the colaspis show up this season, we will be able to compare Dermacor X-100 and CruiserMaxx activity against this pest.  Also, in the past Charlie has treated with pyrethroids for weevil management.  We are curious to see what the rww population is typically like at this site.  Of course, this year may not be a typical year.  That remains to be seen.

I asked Charlie to call me when first emergence of seedlings is observed.  We’ll take observations on date of first emergence, and then stand counts and plant height 14 days after emergence.  If colaspis are a problem in this field, the damage will be observed in those first few weeks after emergence.

We left Charlie’s at about 11 am to head over to Evangeline Parish.  On the way Dave called, because there had been a break-down and planting would be delayed until about 2 or 3 pm.  No problem, we just took our time heading east.  When the time was right, we headed over to meet Dave Morein, Brian (Dave’s son who is now farming with him full-time), and Dennis Fontenot (Consultant).  When we pulled up dark clouds were threatening and rain started sprinkling lightly as we were planting the last field.

This series of fields is bordered on three sides by Miller Lake and a thick stand of trees.  Historically, there are high populations of rice water weevils.  Dennis had scouted this field site for us last season to monitor the adult colaspis in a field of beans next to a cut of rice that had substantial stand loss from colaspis damage.  In this test we will again compare an untreated check to CruiserMaxx and Dermacor X-100 seed treatment.

When we arrived, Dave had some Dermacor X-100 treated seed still loaded in the drill. left-over from planting another field.  We vacuumed out the hopper and loaded untreated seed.  This series of fields is planted in CLXL729 at a 25 lb seeding rate.  In our test, we are comparing an untreated field, and two passes on the south side of a neighboring cut (both are the high points in this area) to Dermacor X-100, and CruiserMaxx treated fields.

We will be scouting intensively during the first two weeks after emergence to see if the colaspis larvae overwintered and may cause damage in the rice.  Dennis had GPS marked his sampling sites in the untreated rice field and we will mark those with flags and sample the area for larvae.  It will be interesting to see if there is a relationship between the adult colaspis population in the soybeans last season, and the population of colapsis larvae in the  seedling rice this season.

I’m not sure what transpired with the rain that was just starting to come down when we left the field.  I’ll be checking in with Kenneth LaHaye this afternoon.  Tentative plans are to plant at the LaHaye farm in Evangeline Parish tomorrow.  Of course, it all depends on the weather.  We also may plant in Acadia, Concordia, and Evangeline Parish this week.

Sorry I did not include pictures, I need to load my download cable in my camera bag.  I’ll try to add pictures in the next few days.

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Today we planted a Horizon Ag Strip Trial at the Lawson Farm in Crowley, La.  At first, we weren’t sure if the soil was dry enough, and there was also a light crust on the soil.

Rain the previous week had left a crust on the soil.

The soil did not want to close over the drill passes - went to plan b.

We were not happy with this drill row appearance - seed is not adequately covered.

After breaking the crust with a harrow, we were able to drill the seed.

Lightly and quickly running a harrow before the drill broke up the crust enough to allow closure of the drill rows.

This test will compare CruiserMaxx and Dermacor X-100 to an untreated check.

Treated seed receives a dye - on the left is CruiserMaxx treated seed and on the right is untreated seed.

We will be looking for colaspis activity in addition to rww efficacy.  A number of clearfield varieties were planted.

In a nearby field, we will compare a variety of seeding rates with CruiserMaxx treatment.  This will help us answer some of the questions about CruiserMaxx activity at lower seeding rates. RWW core samples will be taken 4 weeks after permanent flood to assess insecticide activity.

There is nothing like the appearance of straight, newly planted drill rows. I was impressed by the driving – no GPS used here!

We will be closely watching these two fields for first emergence of seedlings.  Previous research in Arkansas has found that Cruiser treated seed emerges more quickly than untreated seed.  Also, the first two weeks after emergence are a critical time to monitor for damage from colapsis larvae.

I anticipate that we will be planting all over the place next week – if it doesn’t rain Saturday.  The instructions are to pray for NO RAIN.  Tomorrow morning we plan to plant in St. Landry Parish.

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