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Posts Tagged ‘Julien Beuzelin’

I apologize that I haven’t written in a while. We are moving into grant-writing “season”. We are writing a few proposals that address new rice pest problems. You’ll hear more about those projects if they are funded. Just a quick update on the latest news.

We continue to receive reports of rice stink bugs in second crop rice, in some cases with very severe pressure. You can read about this by clicking here. I also received a call today asking what the Re-entry interval for Tenchu 20SG is. The answer is 12 hours – so this means you can safely enter the field 12 hours after the insecticide application.

We have also had some reports of armyworms in crawfish rice – this is in the Evangeline Parish area. Remember that the only thing registered is BT type products, which are really only effective controlling smaller caterpillars. Any other insecticides have the possibility of killing crawfish stocked in the pond.

The LSU AgCenter Extension Entomology program has a couple of trainings this month.

Next week we have the annual advanced entomology training at the Rice Research Station in Crowley on Tuesday, Sept 13 from 9 am to noon. I hope you can join us. I’ll start off by talking about early season pest problems (chinch bugs, bill bugs, sugarcane beetles, etc.). Then we will spend the rest of the training talking about Mexican rice borer management recommendations. Click here for a link to the agenda. We will have three speakers. Speakers will include Mo Way from Texas A&M AgriLife. Mo has studied the MRB for more than 20 years and has graciously agreed to share his insights with us. Dr. Julien Beuzelin (recent graduate of LSU) will talk about his research studying the biology, behavior and secondary host plants (weeds) of MRB. Finally, I will give a presentation on management recommendations and opportunities for cooperators to help us expand the pheromone trapping program. We will have plenty of time for questions from the audience.

Later this month, Gene Reagan and Mo Way are co-hosting their annual MRB site visit in Beaumont, Texas on September 27 to 28, 2011. This is an excellent opportunity to gain first-hand experience scouting for MRB in the field. You will also have the opportunity to learn about the latest research on this pest.

If you are using social media, you are welcome to join the LSU AgCenter Rice Entomology Facebook group page. This is a great place to keep up to date on the latest observations from the field and to share your knowledge with others. Click here to join the group. If you don’t have a Facebook account, you’ll need to create an account first and then request to join the group.

I look forward to seeing many of you at the meetings this month.

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About a week ago Calcasieu Parish County Agent Jimmy Meaux e-mailed me a picture of a borer larva in rice that he suspected was the Mexican rice borer (MRB). This was a highly suspect sample due to a combination of the morphology of the larva and where it was found – which was in the same area where LDAF caught the first adult MRBs in pheromone traps in Louisiana. This confirms our suspicion that MRB are now establishing and reproducing in Louisiana. I would strongly encourage you to familiarize yourself with identification of this pest. Below is some information on this particular field infestation from Johnny’s Saichuk’s field notes. Following this I’m including some information on identification of MRB.

Field Notes
July 14, 2011
Johnny Saichuk

“Well, it is official; we have the Mexican rice borer in Louisiana. Earlier reports were of male moths caught in pheromone traps. Last week county agent Jimmy Meaux was called to a field in Calcasieu parish where he tentatively identified borer larvae as Mexican rice borer. He sent them to Dr. Natalie Hummel whose associate Anna Meszaros and graduate student (under Dr. Gene Reagan) Julien Beuzelin examined the specimens. They confirmed the identity. This afternoon I visited the field with Jimmy where we easily found several borers including the one shown here. I sent the photo to the experts and they just confirmed it. That is one of the advantages of the technology we have today. The photograph was taken at 2:12 p.m. and by 5:30 it was confirmed.

Mexican rice borer larvae infesting a rice plant in Vinton, LA. Photo by Johnny Saichuk.

Jimmy told the farmer, Chris Habetz and his son Brad, we would put up a plaque at their farm. They did not see the humor. The field where this borer was collected had no insecticide seed treatment; however a nearby field is treated with Dermacor. We will follow up to see if borers are discovered there or if the insecticide prevents them from becoming a problem. This is a manageable albeit unwelcome pest. Dermacor and/or timely applications of the pyrethroids can keep them in check in rice.”

The LDAF MRB trapping program is an ongoing survey program in southwest Louisiana that is documenting the spread of this pest. LDAF state entomologist, Tad Hardy, sent me an updated map on the trap counts of MRB in Louisiana.

If you click here you will see a Map of MRB Finds as of July 2011. This map was provided by Mr. Tad Hardy of LDAF.

As Johnny said in his comments, fortunately the MRB is a manageable pest – in large part due to the efforts of LSU AgCenter sugarcane Entomologist Dr. Gene Reagan who has been studying this pest in Texas for decades. MRB effects both sugarcane and rice production in Texas and it appears that it will be something we will be managing in Louisiana also. The first step is to learn to properly identify the pest.

There are a few key characters that will get you most of the way toward identification, but to truly confirm the species you need to view it under a dissecting microscope. If you find specimens that you strongly suspect are MRB you can send them to me and we will confirm the identification. Following are two pictures taken by Anna Meszaros that illustrate the key character used to separate MRB from the rice stalk borer.

1, the color of the hairs:

MRB: light hairs

RSB: dark hairs

2, on the meso-and metathorax of the larva (right above the “prolegs”)

MRB has only one seta (hair)

RSB has two setae.

Mexican rice borer larvae - note the honey colored head capsule and the presence of a single seta (hair) on the meso and meta-thorax dorsal (above) to the proleg. Photo by Anna Meszaros.

Rice stalk borer larvae - note the dark brown head capsule and the presence of two setae (hairs) on the meso and meta-thorax dorsal (above) to the prolegs. Photo by Anna Meszaros.

For more information please refer to this publication: KEY TO SELECTED PYRALOIDEA (LEPIDOPTERA) LARVAE INTERCEPTED AT U. S. PORTS OF ENTRY: REVISION OF PYRALOIDEA IN “KEYS TO SOME FREQUENTLY INTERCEPTED LEPIDOPTEROUS LARVAE” BY WEISMAN, 1986, M. ALMA SOLIS

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