Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘XL745’

I knew my phone was too quiet last week…

Today I’ve have four calls about insect problems in rice. Yesterday I ran the battery down on my phone between phone calls, e-mails and tweeting field observations. Which reminds me, if you are using twitter, you are welcome to follow me @NatHummel for field updates.

These dry conditions are exacerbating problems in drilled rice, which in many cases is dry, dry, dry. We need some rain. The wind is not helping the situation. One consultant, who has decades of experience in rice, called today to tell me he would appreciate more training in identification of uncommon insect problems – namely aphids, thrips and chinch bugs. As we shift away from water-seeded to drill-seeded rice these insects have the potential to become more common pest problems. It looks like that might be happening this year.

This blog posting will focus on many of those “secondary pests” which we happened to observe in Evangeline Parish yesterday. Before I get to that, just a quick update on what is becoming the chinch bug situation.

In Jeff-Davis Parish I have now heard of four additional locations which suffered from infestations of chinch bugs. This brings the count to about 8 to 10 sites with chinch bugs infestations. Some had been treated with Dermacor X-100, but remember Dermacor will not control chinch bugs. CruiserMaxx and NipsitInside should provide control (refer to previous postings about difference in seed treatments for more details). It has been noted that drilled hybrid rice, planted at low seeding rates, needs to be carefully scouted for chinch bugs. This is true primarily because in a field with a low seeding rate, the number of plants per acre is substantially lower than in field planted at a conventional seeding rate. When an insect (such as chinch bugs) infests a field with few plants to begin with, they can cause substantially more injury more quickly than in a field with a thicker stand.

Chinch bugs can be difficult to scout because they have a habit of hiding in cracks during the heat of the day and also because they often feed at the soil line near the base of the plant. This injury caused by feeding on the heart of the rice plant is what causes the rice to throw a red or orange leaf and eventually die from injury. To treat an infestation it is best to apply a flood or flush water across the field and then follow with a pyrethroid insecticide – this strategy drives the insects up onto the plant allowing them to be exposed to the insecticide.

You can click on the pictures to make them larger.

In Evangeline Parish we found a few chinch bugs feeding on the plants.

Chinch bug near base of rice plant.

 We also found a mating pair of chinch bugs on the soil surface between the rows.  Just to illustrate how difficult these can be to scout, can you find the chinch bugs in this picture?

Chinch bug mating pair on the soil surface.

 As I was taking pictures, they shifted position – here is a close-up.

Chinch bug mating pair.

After mating, chinch bugs will deposit eggs, from which first instar nymphs will hatch. We did see some first-instar chinch bugs near the base of the plant.  The first instars look very different from older stages – are very small and bright orange in color.  Here is a composite picture from my files for your reference – these pictures were taken in Jeff-Davis Parish a couple of years back.

 

Yesterday, Anna and I took stand data at the Evangeline Parish Demo test site.  Here is the field map. (I’m in the process of building LSU AgCenter websites for each of the test sites, but suddenly time at my desk is precious and rare). The field is located between Ville Platte and Vidrine at these GPS coordinates: 30°41’42.66″N, 92°24’23.80″W. The plots are flagged with colored flagging according to treatment.

The variety XL745 was planted at a 25 pound/acre seeding rate on March 21, 2011.  First emergence was noted on April 5, 2011. Yesterday, we visited the site two weeks after emergence to take observations on the stand. At this location we are comparing the three seed treatments (CruiserMaxx, Dermacor X-100 and NipsitInside) to an untreated check.

In general, there does not appear to be a significant difference between treatments, but the untreated cuts do not look quite as vigorous.  We will wait to summarize all the stand count data from all sites before making definitive statements about any effect of seed treatments on the stand vigor. Following is a series of field shots comparing the treated strips.

 

Plants grown from Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the left and CruiserMaxx treated seed to the right.

Plants grown from NipsitInside treated seed to the left and Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the right.Plants grown from untreated seed (fungicide only) to the left and NipsitInside treated seed to the right.

Plants grown from Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the left and untreated seed to the right.

Plants grown from NipsitInside treated seed to the right and Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the left.

Plants grown from CruiserMaxx treated seed to the left and NipsitInside treated seed to the left.

Plants grown from untreated seed to the left and CruiserMaxx treated seed to the right.

As we walked across the field site we noticed many fire ants and also parasitoid wasps, which led us to believe there must have been some insects in the field that these predators/parasitoids were consuming.  Sure enough, after some searching we started to find aphids, thrips and chinch bugs.  None are present at levels that are causing noticeable injury in the plots, but we will certainly keep an eye on the populations.

 

Fire ants foraging in the Evangeline Parish test site field.

In this situation, the fire ants are helping us by eating some of the insects that are attacking the rice – including aphids, thrips, and possibly chinch bugs. Of course, they also took a couple of bites out of me  as I was attempting to take picture in the windy conditions at the field. 

Fire ant foraging for insects infesting a rice plant - in this case, it looked like it was searching for thrips.

 

Thrip on a datasheet after it hopped off a rice plant. The datasheet is printed in 10 pt font, so you can see the miniscule size of the thrip adult.

Thrip adult on a rice plant leaf blade - we commonly found them on the blade or in the leaf sheath area. It appeared that feeding injury was causing discoloration on the sheath, but this was not confirmed.

 

We found a few aphids on some of the plants. It is likely that populations would be higher if they were not being attacked by ladybugs.

Ladybugs were also present in the field eating the aphids.

 The herbicides had not gone out yet, they will probably go out today, and so we took a few moments to enjoy a sweet gift of nature – wild blackberries on the edge of the field.

Anna picking blackberries during lunch break – ah the sweet rewards of field work…

Tomorrow we will make some site visits in Jeff-Davis where possible colaspis injury has been reported. In the afternoon, we will head to St. Landry Parish to take stand counts at our demonstration site.

Read Full Post »

Last week we planted the rice water weevil demonstration test sites in Evangeline and St. Landry Parish. Both locations are the hybrid variety XL745. At each location we will be comparing the seed treatments CruiserMaxx, Dermacor X-100 and NipsitInside to an untreated check.

Drilling the strip trial at Fontenot farm in St. Landry Parish.Rice was planted using a 42 foot wide drill pulled by a John Deere.GPS monitoring of planting plots.

The GPS monitoring system was used to line up each of the strips – each treatment was replicated twice across the field.

Drill rows in the field.

Charlie will be growing 1200 acres of rice this year.  This is the last bit of rice he is planting for this season.  Soil conditions were ideal for drilling.  A nearby field has been planted in a Horizon Ag strip trial to evaluate varieties.

LSU AgCenter County Agent Vince Deshotel vacuuming treated seed out of the drill between treatments.

Vince Deshotel vacuumed out the drill between treatments.  We also gathered seed samples and will send them off for analysis to confirm the rate of insecticide applied to the seed.

Dean Reed, Charlie Fontenot and Vince Deshotel after successfully planting our test plots.

We greatly appreciate the help of Dean Reed, Charlie Fontenot and Vince Deshotel in planting this demonstration test site.  Without excellent on-farm cooperators our programs would lack the depth on “real-world” situations. We will let you know when the rice emerges.

Read Full Post »

On March 16, 2011, we planted our first site for the 2011 LSU AgCenter rice water weevil demonstration test.

Acadia Parish County Agent Barrett Courville following the drill as we planted the test plots.

The purpose of our rice water weevil demonstration test is to compare currently recommended seed treatment insecticides on commercial farms in Louisiana. This year we are comparing three insecticide seed treatments (CruiserMaxx, Dermacor X-100 and NipsitINSIDE) to an untreated check. 

Rustin Gilder walking near the flagging on the edge of the plots. Flagging is color-coordinated with the treatments to make it easier to monitor progress during the season.

Here are the details about the Acadia Parish test site:

Parish Acadia
Cooperator Glen Simon & Wes Simon
County Agent Barrett Courville
Consultant Rustin Gilder
Distributor Crowley Grain
Variety XL745
Seeding rate 22
Drill width 36
Length of field 700
Acres per treatment 10.00
Total acres 40
Total lb seed 220
CruiserMaxx – A 15.4 fl oz total
Dermacor X-100 – B 17.5 fl oz total
Nipsit-Inside – C 4.22 fl oz total
Untreated – D no insecticide

We will take stand counts and plant height data 2 weeks after seedling emergence.  To assess insecticide efficacy, we will collect rww soil cores 4 weeks after application of permanent flood.

Field map with color-coding for the treatments. Feel free to drive by and watch the field as the crop matures during the season.

We intend to have a tour stop at the demo test site at the conclusion of the LSU AgCenter South Farm Tour this summer.  Please monitor the blog for an announcement about the date and details.

Acadia Parish Demo test cooperators Wes Simon, Rustin Gilder, Terry Istre and Barrett Courville.

We greatly appreciate the tremendous effort in time and land-use by our cooperators. We will keep you posted on the progress at this site.  For additional information, please contact Barrett Courville.

Read Full Post »

This week we’ve continued to travel the state and meet with cooperators for the LSU AgCenter rice water weevil (rww) demonstration test. In case you are a new reader to the blog, you can read more about rww at http://bit.ly/haGduU. You can also see a video on how to scout for rice water weevil adults and larvae at this website: http://bit.ly/gUJe8R

RWW are the most important insect pest of rice in Louisiana. Adults enter fields either before or after permanent flood.  Injury begins when adults feed on plant leaves making longitudinal scars. If scarring is excessive the field will sometimes have the appearance of being “painted” with white paint. In some instances adult feeding can be severe enough to merit an insecticide spray before application of permanent flood. Mating commences soon after adults enter the field, but oviposition of eggs occurs after application of permanent flood. Larvae hatch from eggs, feed briefly within the leaf sheath, and then swim through the flood water to burrow into the mud and begin feeding on the roots of the rice plant. This larval feeding on the roots is the primary source of damage caused by rice water weevils when they attack the rice plant. In some cases, root pruning can be so severe that plants will fall over in the field. In other cases, root pruning in not severe enough to cause lodging, but can still significantly reduce yield.

The purpose of our rice water weevil demonstration test is to compare currently recommended insecticides on commercial farms in Louisiana. This year we are restricting our test to comparison of three insecticide seed treatments (CruiserMaxx, Dermacor X-100 and NipsitINSIDE) which will be compared to an untreated check. These products were described in my last blog posting, so I won’t spend a lot of time describing them here.

Yesterday we met with Farmer Charlie Fontenot, Crop Consultant Dean Reed, and County Agent Vince Deshotel in St. Landry Parish. Charlie cooperated with us last year, and his farm had the most severe rice water weevil pressure of all locations. It will be interesting to see what we find this year. Charlie intends to plant XL745 at a seeding rate of 25 lbs per acre. We will plant two passes (reps) of each seed treatment, which will be compared to an untreated check. There is a good chance that we will plan a field meeting at this site sometime later this summer. We anticipate planting in mid-March.

After we completed our discussion about demo test plans, Bruce Schultz joined us to interview Charlie Fontenot for a feature story in Louisiana Farm and Ranch. Charlie was honored as St. Landry Parish Farmer of the Year for 2010. An accomplishment that he certainly deserves. Charlie has ramped up his production over the last few years and runs a beautiful operation in St. Landry. Look for the story in next month’s issue of Louisiana Farm and Ranch.

Today we met with Farmer Wes Simon (and his son Ethan), Crop Consultant Rustin Gilder, and County Agent Barrett Courville in Acadia Parish. 

County Agent Barrett Courville, Farmer Wes Simon and I discussing plans at the field in Acadia Parish.

This is our first year working with Wes and his father Glen.  Wes intends to plant either XL729 or XL745 at a seeding rate of 22 lbs per acre. 

Wes Simon measuring out the plot size with his tractor.

The planting arrangement will be the same as at Charlie’s farm – two passes for each seed treatment which will be compared to an untreated check. Depending on the weather this weekend, Wes will probably plant sometime next week. There is a good chance we will have a tour stop here in conjunction with the LSU AgCenter south farm tour this summer.

After we left Wes, we headed over to Calcasieu Parish to meet with Farmer Mark Stelly, Landowner Johnny Hensgens, Crop Consultant Randy Verret and County Agents Jimmy Meaux and Dusty Zaunbrecher. 

County Agents Jimmy Meaux, Dusty Zaunbrecher, Farmer Mark Stelly, and Johnny Hensgens discussing plans for the demo test site.

Plans for the demo field site in this parish will be very similar to our set-up in Acadia Parish. Mark intends to plant XL745 at a seeding rate of 25 pounds per acre.  Again, depending on the weather, this site will be planted sometime before early April.

Now we are headed to Breaux Bridge for their annual winter rice production meeting at 6 pm tonight at the St. Martin Parish LSU AgCenter office. I’ll discuss seed treatments for rice water weevil management.

All photos taken by Anna Meszaros.

Read Full Post »